Freelance Sports Reporter

ALOMAR TERMINATED

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ALOMAR TERMINATED

Major League Baseball announced that Roberto Alomar has been terminated as a consultant to Major League Baseball and placed on the ineligible list.

MLB Commissioner Rob Manfred said in a statement:

“At my office’s request, an independent investigation was conducted by an external legal firm to review an allegation of sexual misconduct reported by a baseball industry employee earlier this year involving Mr. Alomar in 2014. Having reviewed all of the available evidence from the now completed investigation, I have concluded that Mr. Alomar violated MLB’s policies, and that termination of his consultant contract and placement on MLB’s Ineligible List are warranted. We are grateful for the courage of the individual who came forward. MLB will continue to strive to create environments in which people feel comfortable speaking up without fear of recrimination, retaliation, or exclusion.”

The news didn’t appear to surprise anyone. Maybe that is because Alomar’s life — and lifestyle — since he retired from baseball in 2004 has been a source of ambiguity and allegation.

His past certainly speaks to his character, but it does not provide any additional evidence to support the latest claims of sexual misconduct. The recent allegations of “sexual misconduct,” while limited in scope, suggest that the League made their decision without due process. Hasty? We could debate this point all day and night.

MLB acted swiftly separate themselves from any future media attention. Manfred said he “concluded that Mr. Alomar violated MLB’s policies, and that termination of his consultant contract [is] warranted.”

Fair enough.

As commissioner, Manfred is responsible for protecting Major League Baseball and its reputation. But his resume is also largely tied to legal work which would suggest, Manfred has a working knowledge of the justice process. How does he square his decision in light of what he knows about due process?

Based on the statement released by MLB on Friday, a decision has already been made — based on an internal investigation. No evidence has been released.

Alomar is silent. Does he deny the allegations? If so, shouldn’t he — along with the alleged victim — deserve the same right as anyone. He is still innocent until proven guilty, right? That does still exist in this world, I hope.

This is not a defense of Roberto Alomar. If he doesn’t deny the allegations, and he is proven guilty in a court of law, he deserves the punishment. But the MLB has already made their decision in advance: guilty. MLB did not only make their decision on Alomar, they also stated their support of the alleged “victim” writing, “In order to respect the privacy of the individual who came forward and to protect their confidentiality, MLB will provide no further details on this matter.”

I appreciate the League’s willingness to support anyone who was abused or mistreated regardless of gender, race, ethnicity, etc., what I fail to understand is why isn’t Alomar granted the same protection?

Ending on a much lighter note, please read this disclaimer: I am not an attorney. I have never studied law. But I did stay at a Holiday Inn Express last night.

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About the author

John Strubel

Hi. My name is John Strubel. Thanks for visiting my website. I write primarily about my passion: baseball. In addition, I occasionally publish posts and podcasts related to sports media, journalism and technology impacting the industry. You can also connect with me on social media @johnstrubel.

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Freelance Sports Reporter

John Strubel

Hi. My name is John Strubel. Thanks for visiting my website. I write primarily about my passion: baseball. In addition, I occasionally publish posts and podcasts related to sports media, journalism and technology impacting the industry. You can also connect with me on social media @johnstrubel.

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Hi. My name is John Strubel. Thanks for visiting my website. I write primarily about my passion: baseball. You can also connect with me on social media @johnstrubel.