Bud Selig

It’s just past 10 p.m. (edt) and I begin toggling through the channels looking for the New York Mets and Seattle Mariners game. I pass by the short schedule of West Coast games — the Los Angeles Dodgers and San Francisco Giants, the Pittsburgh Pirates and San Diego Padres, Minnesota Twins and Oakland Athletics — before I reach my destination.

Welcome to Safeco Park.

As I lean back on the sofa, I think to myself: How many baseball fans are interested in this game? I mean, really, outside the hardcore Mets and Mariners fan bases. Is this what former MLB commissioner Bud Selig had in mind when he convinced every major league team owner that interleague play was good for the game? Was he envisioning a late-July Mets/Mariners showdown to generate new fans and higher attendance?

I think not.

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They were known as the Great Lakes Gang: Bud Selig, Jerry Reinsdorf, Stanton Cook, Carl Pohlad, Peter O’Malley and William Bartholomay, a cabal consisting of a half-dozen baseball owners leading the charge in ousting Fay Vincent as baseball commissioner in first week of September 1992.

Vincent came to Major League Baseball as a deputy commissioner in the spring 1989 and unwittingly was pushed into the commissioner’s role exactly six months later, when then commissioner A. Bartlett Giamatti suffered a fatal heart attack.

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“No one will argue about who baseball’s greatest Commissioner is. It is the ninth Commissioner, Bud Selig. Nine is obviously a magic number for baseball the number of players on the field, the number of innings in a game, and the ninth Commissioner symbolizes the magic fo baseball himself The office of Commissioner of Baseball is today and will ever be the lengthening shadow of Bud Selig. And when people ask, When was baseballs Golden Age? those of us who have been privileged to be involved in it in this age will be able to answer unequivocally, We have lived through it. Baseballs golden age coincides with Bud Selig’s commissionership in no small measure because of the service he has rendered to the sport. – George Will

When Bud Selig’s name echoes over the public address system at any Major League ballpark, a resounding hum of boos fill the air. Simply put, baseball fans don’t like him.

There is a stigma attached to the title Major League Baseball Commissioner. It comes with the territory. Fans always have, and probably always will, rebel against the commissioner of the game. The rain of boos and jeers will never end as long as Selig remains commissioner. The reaction is an embarrassing public display of ignorance on the part of baseball fans.

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