Freelance Digital Journalist

BUCKNER IS GONE, BUT REMEMBERED WELL

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Twitter has a history of making bad things worse, but not today. Most baseball fans on the social media platform have been humble and respectful in the wake of the news of the death of Bill Buckner.

In 2008, Buckner returned to Fenway Park. He was received by a standing ovation. I wrote about that day and how ” … it appeared Red Sox Nation was ready to forgive Buckner. The team had snapped their near century long “curse” of failure, winning their second World Series ring in four years. The team decided it was time to bury the Buckner memory … Game 6 of the 1986 was now a moment in sports history. The tension lifted, the play forgiven and we all live happily ever after.”

Unfair? Yes.

Unexpected? No.

We should all move on. Like Mitch Williams or Joe Carter in ’93, Sid Bream in ’91, Bobby Thomson in ’51 or Aaron Boone in ’03, despite years of success, Buckner is tied to one game, one moment, one play.

If social media is any indication of the greater feeling, we took that first step today.

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About the author

John Strubel

Hi. My name is John Strubel. I am a storyteller. I love to write. My writing is predominantly related to my greatest passion in life: baseball. Thanks for visiting my website.

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Freelance Digital Journalist

John Strubel

Hi. My name is John Strubel. I am a storyteller. I love to write. My writing is predominantly related to my greatest passion in life: baseball. Thanks for visiting my website.

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